table I John Pawson

Undoubted master of Minimalism, the famous English designer, evoking an architectural structure essentiality, realize a table built with horizontal and vertical boards. Dimensions refer to the archetype of “refectory” and the name itself “Table” remindsthat “a table’s a table!”, a straight sign in interiors, whether used as a worktop or as a dining table.

characteristics

Wengé or cherrywood finished conglomerate wooden structure.

dimensions

W. 240 D. 80 H. 72

W. 240 D. 80 H. 72

Wengé or cherrywood finished conglomerate wooden structure.

John Pawson
John Pawson

John Pawson was born in 1949 in Halifax, northern England. After studying at Eton College, he spent a year travelling in the Middle East, India and Australia. In 1973 Pawson left for Japan where he got a job as a professor of English at the University of Economics in Nagoya. In Tokyo he came into contact with the designer Shiro Kuramata. Pawson observed Kuramata at work, learning that it is possible to experiment boldly with materials and technology without sacrificing the spirit of austerity and simplicity. In 1979 Pawson enrolled at the Architectural Association in London, leaving it in 1981 to form his own studio. From the beginning, his work focused on the exploration of the fundamental problems of space, proportion, light and materials, rather than develop a set of stylistic gestures. He received commissions from the writer Bruce Chatwin, the opera director Pierre Audi and the art collector Doris Lockhart Saatchi, run in parallel to several art exhibition spaces, including the Waddington Galleries in London and PPOW gallery in New York. The foundations of his work being immersed in the past, in a row of simple expression that has been a consistent component both of the Oriental and Western tradition, from the Japanese concepts of Zen up to Cistercian monastic architecture or the serenity of the empty churches of Saenredam.